Manifesto

The spirit of Stonewall

A scream of joy that pierces the night

Abstract

The fabulous manifesto of our liberation is a scream of joy that pierces the night! IS "The spirit of Stonewall" that, a 50 years from the epic revolt, it never went out because it burns inside and when it can, it explodes out. It is an integral part of that great cultural, political, sexual revolution of which we are figl *, sisters, accomplices, lovers that continues to inebriate us and that we must never let go off. We are citizens and citizens of the world and not of narrow, cramped borders cruelly marked by walls and borders. Our refusal for the ugliness that suffocates our land must be radical. Rebel, "We remain human", authors and authors of a great design: ours! Let's train at curiosity, To wonder, All 'euphoria, especially the freedom, we go through liberation and reject fear, closure and war to the sender, build collectivities, dust off intelligence because from there beauty is reborn ...

The Stonewall revolt broke out one night fifty years ago when that * / e / i who occupied the last places decided that just that night they would not once again have suffered violence, abuse, cancellation. They did not think about the price to pay and opened breaches that in this half century we lesbians, trans and gays have traveled all over the world. Stonewall was not the spark of a night, other revolts, other struggles, other imaginary had preceded it, other rebellions have continued, even in our country where the movements that today we call lgbtiq + arise, following Stonewall, on the same wave with which take shape in other European countries, affirming the speech of lgbtiq + people about themselves, as a social and political subject and no longer as an object subjected to the interventions of science, the church, the state.

Yesterday's desires, words, struggles today remind us that nothing is taken for granted and nothing is established for ever, they allow us to understand that the majority choice is not always ours, that even the normalization of our subjectivity, which today seems to be the only desirable way, has behind him speech, experiences, theories and fights with one "revolutionary" push or in any case transformative, without which change would have been impossible.

It is the scream of joy that pierces the night the fabulous manifesto of our liberation! Transform the present, shape the future and the past remains a precious heritage, because if revolt had not occurred our life would be different. And since it's not over, if revolt were to explode again the world will certainly be more beautiful.

The fabulous movement is that of Stonewall of 28 June 1969, historically datable in our memory because it is a turning point, an act and a myth from which we do not go back. From oppression to liberation, with infinite marvelous perspectives and the consequent transformation of material conditions of life. New free bodies and free minds that will produce politics and culture, giving form and substance to our world. The motion by its nature it is not static but expands in time and space, from the center to the suburbs, from the south to the north of the world more than one can imagine. IS the spirit of Stonewall, never extinguished, burning inside and, when it can, it explodes out. An integral part of that unavoidable cultural, political, sexual revolution of which we are figl *, sisters, accomplices, lovers that intoxicates us and makes us run along the back the same thrill of then. "Love love let me come with the revolution" the slogan that appeared on the walls in the seventies tells us that revolution is joy, pleasure, euphoria. The revolution, as such, contains what the masters of the world methodically take away from us because their rhetoric, with its relative construction of meaning, places us outside - fortunately - from their gray walls, branding us as degenerat *. To overturn this logic, as happened on the night of 28 June of fifty years ago, is for us all a duty because it means changing perspective: from denial to fabulous visibility. Let our anger explode, break the cage, come out, rejoice, all positive declinations, opposed and contrary to those that today grip us, based on the great fear that imprisons a world cruelly marked by walls, borders, borders.

We must train ourselves to curiosity, to wonder, to euphoria, above all to freedom, to go through liberation and reject fear, closure and war to the sender. We are citizens and citizens of the world and not of narrow, narrow borders. Our refusal for the ugliness that suffocates our land must be radical. Rebel, "We remain human", authors and authors of a great design - ours -, we build collectivities, brush up intelligences because from there beauty is reborn ...

The Stonewall uprising broke out one night fifty years ago when some * / e / of us decided that just that night they would not suffer violence, abuse, cancellation again. This was done by those * / e / i who occupied the last places, who could not hide behind any privilege, and they did not think of the price to pay: with a visionary and passionate struggle they opened breaches that in this half century we lesbians, trans and gay we have traveled all over the world. That revolt was not a solitary gesture but found companions on many and many paths that passionately cultivated the idea of ​​revolution, of the radical transformation of society, first of all feminists and the movements of blacks and blacks, that is who wanted - and wants - break down a system of violent and exclusive power based on the subordination of a genus, a "race", a class.

Stonewall was not born from nothing, was not the spark of a night, other revolts, other struggles, other imaginary had preceded it, in America and elsewhere. And so over time, other Stonewall, other rebellions have pursued the transformation, dreamed of revolution.

Also in our country the movements that today we call lgbtiq + are born, following Stonewall, on the same wave with which they take shape in most European countries, therefore the historical delay of our themes in Italy with respect to the European space is certainly not attributable to our movements whose history is coherent and connected with what happens in other European countries: the causes must be found elsewhere. The story of the collective speech taking of non-heterogeneous subjectivities in Italy begins in the 1972 when Mariasilvia Spolato - one of the pioneers who gave so much and paid for our freedom that we want to remember here since she died last October after decades of oblivion - she decides to participate in the first Italian 8 March by raising the sign "Homosexual Liberation". A few days later this first spark is the moment of our little Stonewall: the 5 April 1972 the newborn Outside (Italian revolutionary homosexual unitary front) in Sanremo he objected to a congress of sexology that was intended to discuss "treatments" of homosexuality. It is an international event that succeeds in bringing the congress to a close in advance, provokes so much clamor that it gains a lot of media space by tearing apart the secular silence on our subjectivity but above all it affirms a new revolutionary concept: of homosexuality, lesbianism, transsexuality, they speak gay, lesbian and trans, it is the questioning of the concept of normality and the speaking of lgbtiq + people about themselves, as a social and political subject and no longer as an object subjected to the interventions of science, the church, the state.

Later, there were many other our small Stonewall, many and many pioneers and pioneers that marked the way for us today first of all we need to remember, to build a collective memory, to save our history from being erased and by creeping revisionism always in place.

The desires, the words, the struggles of yesterday help us to imagine, to build, to pursue those of today, they remind us that nothing is taken for granted and nothing is established for ever, they allow us to understand that the majority choice is not always the ours, that even the normalization of our subjectivities, which today seems the only desirable way, has behind it speech, experiences, theories and struggles with a "revolutionary" or at least transformative push, without which the change would have been impossible and probably not in the future.

ELENA BIAGINI & PORPORA MARCASCIANO

for FESTIVAL MIX MILAN, 33th Edition

Elena Biagini: historical, author of "The unexpected emergence. The movement of lesbians in Italy over the years '70 and' 80 ', a lesbian activist since the early years' 90, first in Action Gay Lesbian Florence and then coordinating "Let's Breccia".

Purple Marcasciano: Honorary President of the MIT (Trans Identity Movement) of which she has been the founder and activist since the 1970s and vice president of the ONIG (National Identity Gender Observatory), she has created and coordinated various research on the topic of transsexualism and gender identity above all in the historical field producing publications and essays.

#MORELOVE #LOVERIOT & # CINEMALGBT +